November 5, 2022

Registration
8:00 a.m. – to 5:00 p.m.

Foyer

Exhibition Table Tops
8:30 a.m. – to 5:00 p.m.

Foyer

 Exhibitor tables will be staffed during meals and breaks.

Track 1
Track 2
Track 3
Industry Track

8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

Battleford room

CSAM-SMCA Annual General Meeting
Continental Breakfast will be provided

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Adam Ballroom
Welcome & TED-Style Presentations

10:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Break

10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Track 1

Terrace Lounge

Review and Discussion on the Impacts of Virtual Supervised Consumption Services and Remote Overdose Monitoring

Track 2

Batosche Room

Cannabis and Alcohol

Track 3

William Pascoe Room

Substance Use Related Care; Nurse and Nurse Practitioner Resources and Lessons Learned

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Lunch

Battleford Room

Treating People With Opioid Use Disorder at Homewood Health: Approach & Outcomes

(Unaccredited Session)

1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Track 1

Terrace Lounge

Screen, Brief Intervention, and Referral: A Brief Assessment Tool for Primary Care Providers
Track 2

Batosche Room

Exploring Models of Care

Track 3

William Pascoe Room

Driving, Homelessness and the Public Supply of Addictive Drugs

2:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Break

2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Track 1

Terrace Lounge

Topics in Inpatient and Outpatient Care
Track 2

Batosche Room

Still Naively Hopeful, and You Can Be Too! Again! — First-Year-In-Practice Learnings Around Substance Use Disorders

Track 3

2:30 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

William Pascoe Room

Quebec Clinical Guidance to Using Slow-Release Oral Morphine in OAT

3:15 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

William Pascoe Room

Developing a National, Online Training Curriculum for Pain Management and Substance Use Disorder for Postgraduate Medical Education and Continuing Professional Development

Who Will Be By Your Side at 4am? A Case for Peer Support

Jennifer Eyford, BSc, MSc, BN, RN, Associate Director of Mental Health, Addiction and Outreach, The Alex Community Health Centre

While working the night shift at a supervised consumption site, front-line addiction medicine nurse Jennifer Eyford witnessed a transformational moment of connection and hope between a young woman who had just overdosed on opioids and a peer support worker. In her TED-style talk at CSAM-SMCA 2022, she will explore the impact of peer support and consider how to best integrate peer support into addiction treatment.

What Else We Bring

Sharon Vipler, MD, CCFP(AM), dipl.ABAM, Program Medical Director, Addiction Medicine and Substance Use Services | Fraser Health Authority

What drives us to be caregivers, and what is being challenged when patients are not ready for what we have to offer? In this TED-Style talk, Dr. Vipler will explore what happens internally during difficult encounters, and encourage introspective curiosity. You’ll learn to recognize and name your experience, and consider how those moments can feel like an identity crisis for those of us who identify as healers and fixers.

Review and Discussion on the Impacts of Virtual Supervised Consumption Services and Remote Overdose Monitoring

Sumantra (Monty) Ghosh, Assistant Professor, University of Alberta

Supervised consumption services (SCS) are evidence-based interventions and part of the continuum of care for people who use substances. The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated existing barriers to SCS and created new ones, including the inability to use drugs in a group setting due to restrictions on gathering. Virtual SCS is a novel approach to addressing some of these barriers. In this symposium, presenters will discuss various aspects of virtual supervised consumption and overdose monitoring including efficacy, impacts, outcomes, perceptions, safety and acceptability.

Beliefs, Attitudes and Perceptions Around Novel Virtual Supervised Consumption Services Among People Who Use Drust in Canada: A Qualitative Study

Tyler Marshall, PhD MPH, Postdoctoral Associate, University of Calgary
Stephanie Jones, MSc, Evaluation Associate, Three Hive Consulting
Oona Krieg, BSc, Chief Operating Officer, BRAVE Co-Op
Dylan Viste, BHSc, Research Coordinator, University of Calgary
Monty Ghosh, MD, MSc, MPH, Addictions Physician, University of Calgary

Researchers interviewed 12 people who have used virtual supervised consumption services (VSCS) to gain a better understanding of the program’s strengths and weaknesses. Those who used VSCS appreciate that the service offers privacy, dignity and a reduction of stigma and shame. They expressed concerns about emergency response times and ambulance costs, technological challenges and lack of video-call options, as well as being connected to a different operator each time. Researchers concluded that VSCS may be an accessible intervention, but more research is required.

Exploring the Impact of Novel Virtual Supervised Consumption Services Across Canada: A Descriptive Study

Tyler Marshall, PhD, MPH, Research Associate, University of Calgary
Dylan Viste, BHSc, Research Coordinator, University of Calgary
Oona Krieg, BSc, Chief Operating Officer | BRAVE Co-Op
Monty Ghosh, MD, MSc, MPH, Addictions Physician, University of Calgary

Researchers analyzed more than 5,000 calls to the National Overdose Response Service and The Brave App, including more than 1,800 virtually supervised consumptions. Of those, 35 people required emergency response, and there were no fatalities. Opioids, methamphetamines and cocaine were the most common substances used, and intravenous and inhalation the most common routes. Researchers concluded that virtual supervised consumption services may have comparable safety to physical supervised consumption services (SCS), and that it could fill a gap in services for those who use the inhalation route, since most SCS programs do not allow it.

Beyond Overdose and Opioids: Additional Benefits of VSCS Identified Through Qualitative Interviews, Including Peer Support and Methamphetamine De-escalation

Nathan Rider, BScH, MD, Resident Physician, AHS
Sumantra (Monty) Ghosh, MD, MBT, MSc, DM-EMDM, FRCPC, ISAM, Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Alberta
Tyler Marshall, PhD, MPH, Post-Doctoral Fellow, University of Alberta
Boogyung Seo, Research Assistant, University of Calgary
Dylan Viste, BHS, Research Assistant, University of Calgary

Researchers interviewed 15 people who used the National Overdose Response Service (NORS), a virtual supervised consumption service conducted by telephone. The objective of the interviews was to ascertain the impact of NORS beyond overdose prevention. Positive impacts included: providing peer-based support for mental health and addictions; de-escalating methamphetamine-related psychosis and agitation; providing education on safer substance use and self-care; connecting clients with other community resources; and providing a space for people to come together as a community. Researchers concluded that NORS has unique impacts that go beyond overdose supervision and reversal, including offering supports for mental health and methamphetamine use.

Cannabis and Alcohol

Does Canada Have a “Safe Supply” of Cannabis in its Licensed, Regulated System?

Mike DeVillaer, M.A.Sc., Policy Analyst, McMaster University, Dept Psychiatry & Behavioural Neurosciences

An important goal of cannabis legalization in Canada was to replace an illegal supply of unknown potency and integrity with a safe, regulated supply of known potency. To assess the success of that goal, researchers reviewed five years of Health Canada Compliance and Enforcement Reports as well as recalls. They found numerous breaches ranging from products contaminated with mildew and pesticides to the purchase of illegal seeds and misleading of investigators. Researchers concluded that there were enough compromised processes and products to warrant concern, and that there are several reasons to believe that the extent of infractions is greater than routinely detected.

Cannabis Use Among Adults with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: What Are We Learning?

Alasdair Barr, PhD, Associate Professor, University of British Columbia
Monique Reboe- Benjamin, MPhil, Msc., Research Co-ordinator, University of Saskatchewan
Andrea DesRoches, Msc, Research Co-ordinator, University of Saskatchewan
Mariam Alaverdashvili, PhD, Provincial Research Facilitator, University of Saskatchewan
Thuy Le, PhD, Research Officer, University of Saskatchewan
Aamena Kapasi, PhD, Psychologist, University of Alberta
Dorothy Reid, Msc., Advocate, Canada Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder (CanFASD)
Lisa Brownstone, CanFASD Family Advisory Committee Member, Canada Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder (CanFASD)
CJ Lutke, Advocate
Mansfield Mela, MBBS, FWACP, MSc. Psych, FRCPC, Professor, University of Saskatchewan

Researchers surveyed 50 people with diagnosed or suspected FASD and 45 caregivers, and also conducted focus groups. People with FASD said cannabis helps them abstain from other illicit substances and cope with past trauma. Caregivers and frontline staff said a lack of impulse control influences adverse effects and chronic cannabis use. Researchers concluded that cannabis can be a helpful therapy to improve quality of life for FASD individuals, however, more targeted education and further research are needed.

Ethanol and Cannabis: More Than the Sum of Their Parts?

Matthew Lamont, MMed, PhD, MD Student | Memorial University of Newfoundland

Half of all young adult cannabis users report simultaneous use of ethanol and cannabis, but the combined effects of these two substances are not well understood. Dr. Lamont examined more than two decades of studies on ethanol and cannabis and found that when the two substances are taken together there are unique pharmacological interactions including neuronal dopaminergic activity, memory impairment, pharmacokinetic profiles, and additive vs. synergistic effects. He concludes that, given the increasing trend of concomitant ethanol and cannabis use, it is imperative that we have a clear understanding of how these substances interact and ultimately how this interaction affects patterns of human behavior.

Cannabinoids As Medicine: Are We There?

Gregory C Bunt, MD, Past President, International Society of Addiction Medicine

Presenters will survey the current legal and pharmacological landscape for cannabinoids, and examine current research on therapeutic potential of several cannabinoids for treating clinical indications including cannabis, tobacco, and opiate use disorders. They will also discuss how to develop these as therapeutics in compliance with the FDA guidelines, and consider the physician’s role when dealing with patients requesting medicinal cannabis or other cannabinoids.

Substance Use Treatment Recommendations for Working with Individuals with FASD

Erika Makowecki, MEd, Doctoral Student, University of Alberta
Aamena Kapasi, Post Doctoral Fellow, University of Alberta
Viktoria Wuest, BSc, Research Assistant, University of Alberta
Meghan Regier, BA, Volunteer Research Assistant, University of Alberta
Devyn Rorem, M.Ed, Graduate Research Assistant, University of Alberta
Jacqueline Pei, RPsych, PhD, Professor, University of Alberta

Presenters will introduce new recommendations for helping people with FASD and substance use disorders. The recommendations are based on synthesized data from a scoping review, environmental scan, and interviews with treatment providers, caregivers, and individuals with FASD, as well as consultation with an advisory team. Key themes include recognizing brain-based differences, understanding the adaptations and accommodations needed for success in treatment, and collaboration with individuals with FASD to co-create strategies to support them in treatment.

Alcohol and Health: Less is Better. The Update of the Canadian Low Risk Drinking Guidelines

Peter Butt, MD, CCFP(AM), FCFP, Associate Professor, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan
Catherine Paradis, Ph.D., Associate Director, Research, CCSA
Hanie Edalati, PhD, Research and Policy Analyst, CCSA
Christine Levesque, PhD, Research and Policy Analyst, CCSA
Dr. Nikita Sanger, Research and Policy Analyst, CCSA
Ryan McCarthy, MSc, Director, Knowledge Mobilization, CCSA
Jennifer Reynolds, PhD, CCSA

Presenters will briefly describe the process to update the 2011 Canadian Low Risk Drinking Guidelines, present the updated guidance, and open discussion on the implications for knowledge mobilization.

Substance Use Related Care: Nurse and Nurse Practitioner Resources and Lessons Learned

Jared Bonis, Nurse Practitioner, HSN Addictions Service
Katie Dunham, BSc, BScN, MN, NP-PHC, Nurse Practitioner, META PHI
Stephanie Bonis, MN, NP, Nurse Practitioner, Health Sciences North

The META:PHI Withdrawal Management Services Manual was created by and for nurse practitioners working in addiction medicine. This presentation will review components of the manual including red flags for hospital transfer, treatment pathways, sample policies, consultation notes, and more. Presenters will review educational resources and networking opportunities to help support nurses in these roles, and raise key questions that every nurse should consider before taking a job supporting people who use substances.

Screen, Brief Intervention, and Referral (SBIR): A Brief Assessment Tool for Primary Care Providers

Daniel Dacombe, BA, MSc, Project Lead, Shared Health
Erin Knight, MD, Educational Director, Addiction Medicine Enhanced Skills Residency Program, University of Manitoba

The Manitoba Shared Health Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral (SBIR) Tool is a digital tool that screens for alcohol and mental health issues at a point before they are typically recognized. Based on a 2015 pilot study, the SBIR Tool is a proactive, patient-centred, and evidence-based approach, and the first of its kind to be based on Canada’s Low-Risk Drinking Guidelines (LRDG). Presenters will make a case for using SBIR in primary care settings and provide a demonstration of the digital tool and the screening algorithm. Attendees will also receive a practical plan for rolling out similar digital SBIR/LRDG tools in their primary care systems as well as recommendations for care pathways for patients identified as high-risk.

Exploring Models of Care

Virtual Care for Opioid Agonist Therapy: Evaluating Clients’ Experiences During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Kelly Suschinsky, PhD, Program Evaluation Coordinator, Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre
Kim Corace, PhD, CPsych, Vice President, Innovation & Transformation, Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre
Jennifer Wyman, MD, Associate Medical Director, Substance Use Service, Women’s College Hospital
Pamela Leece, MD, Public Health Physician, Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion
Amy Porath, PhD, Director of Research and Knowledge Mobilization, Knowledge Institute on Child and Youth Mental Health and Addictions
Sue Cragg, MBA, Knowledge Broker, Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction
Sarah Konefal, PhD, Research and Policy Analyst, Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction
Priscille Pana, MA, Research, planning and programming officer, Direction régionale la Santé Publique de Montréal
Susan Barrass, MA, Policy Analyst, Health Canada

Researchers interviewed 393 people about their experience receiving virtual opioid agonist therapy (OAT) during the COVID-19 Pandemic. Most clients had positive experiences, indicating that virtual OAT was easy to access, saved time and/or money, and improved access to care. Clients said their prescriber was able to assess their needs and took the time to listen to them, and that clients could be more open during virtual visits compared to office visits. Approximately half noted room for improvement with virtual care, such as privacy concerns, and slightly more than half wished to maintain virtual OAT beyond the pandemic.

Virtual Low Barrier Urgent Access to Opioid Agonist Therapy: Alberta’s VODP

Nathaniel Day, MD, CCFP, ABAM, FASAM, CHE, Medical Director, Alberta Health Services
Kelly Smith, BA, Manager, Alberta Health Services
Maureen Wass, MA, Program Evaluation Facilitator, Alberta Health Services

The Virtual Opioid Dependency Program (VODP) uses video, phone and text to deliver opioid agonist therapy to clients across Alberta. The VODP recently expanded its Low Barrier Urgent Access (LBUA) service to provide OAT to clients who struggle to comply with routine requirements of OAT, such as those in police detention, living in shelters, and using supervised consumption sites. Over a nine-month period in 2021, LBUA completed same-day methadone initiations for 359 unique clients using Zoom. In this session, presenters will describe the development and preliminary outcomes of the LBUA service and explore how low barrier models of care can facilitate access to evidence-based treatment for opioid use disorder.

Les ajustements dans les services spécialisés en dépendance pour mieux répondre aux besoins des personnes présentant un trouble persistant d’usage de substance

Adjustments in Specialized Addiction Services to Better Meet the Needs of People with Persistent Substance Use Disorder

Myriam Beaulieu, ps.éd., M.Sc.,ph.D. student, UQTR
Joël Tremblay, professor, UQTR

This presentation will be delivered in French.
Les services spécialisés en dépendance (SSD) sont généralement conçus pour des personnes dont le trouble d’usage de substance (TUS) est transitoire alors que parmi celles qui les utilisent, certaines présentent un TUS persistant. Une récente méta-analyse montre que les traitements de plus de 18 mois sont plus efficaces que les traitements habituels pour réduire les comportements de consommation. Mais, outre la nécessité de leur offrir une continuité de services dans le temps, peu de données scientifiques viennent étayer les moyens à déployer pour mieux desservir cette population. Objectif: Cibler les ajustements dans l’organisation des services spécialisés en dépendance et les stratégies cliniques à mettre en place pour adapter l’offre de service aux personnes présentant une problématique de TUS persistant. Méthode :Une démarche de développement de consensus, utilisant une méthode Delphi modifiée, a été réalisée auprès de gestionnaires et de cliniciens dans sept centres de SSD du Québec. Résultats: Les trois phases de la démarche ont permis d’identifier 93 propositions d’aménagements de services qui ont fait consensus parmi les participants. Ces propositions ont été organisées selon trois axes (durée, acuité, complexité) et quatre principes cliniques. Conclusion: Le modèle issu de cette démarche peut constituer une base pour poursuivre la réflexion sur l’aménagement des services sur le plan macro-organisationnel, micro-organisationnel et clinique

Paradigm Shift: Creating an Appropriate, Structured and Systematic Addiction Medicine Model of Care

Sharon Vipler, MD, CCFP(AM), dipl.ABAM, Program Medical Director, Addiction Medicine and Substance Use Services, Fraser Health Authority

This presentation will discuss the Fraser Health Authority’s approach to creating a structured addiction medicine model of care. It will cover the role of Rapid Access to Addiction Care clinics, the role of Virtual Health Addiction Care services, the preservation of medical withdrawal beds for appropriate patients, and the creation of Substance Use Services Access Teams which facilitate navigation of addiction medicine services. Thus far, the model has streamlined the intake and assessment process for all care pathways, not only allowing for appropriate allocation of inpatient resources, but also the provision of early, individualized and equitable care for each client.

Edmonton O-day'min Primary Care Network Nurse Practitioner Led Clinic

Ashley Devenney, MN, NP, Nurse Practitioner, Edmonton O-Day’Min Primary Care Network
Lisa Trahan, MN, NP, Nurse Practitioner, Edmonton O-Day’Min Primary Care Network

In this presentation attendees will learn how an Edmonton clinic established and led by nurse practitioners has created a medical home for marginalized and vulnerable patients, initiating and maintaining opioid agonist therapy (OAT), treating hepatitis C, dramatically decreasing emergency department visits and referring patients to specialists and other health services.

Nowhere To Go: Shelter Restrictions and Their Health Effects on Individuals Deprived of Housing, Including Those Using Substances

Avital Pitkis, BScN, RN, MD completion 2023, Medical Student, McMaster University
Robin Lennox, MD, CCFP, Family Physician, McMaster University

Service restriction is the practice of limiting or denying access to emergency shelter for a set period of time; reasons for service restriction range from possession of illicit drugs to violating shelter policies. For people deprived of housing, service restriction presents a significant barrier not only to shelter, but to the health supports that often come with shelter. This presentation will discuss the preliminary results of a study examining the impact of service restriction on health. Presenters will describe the characteristics of shelter users who are service restricted compared to shelter users who have not experienced service restriction, and the differences in health care utilization, mortality and morbidity among these two groups.

Driving, Occupational Safety and Substance Use

Mina Huang, BSc, Medical Student, University of British Columbia
Nitasha Puri, MD, CCFP(AM), dipABAM, Physician, Fraser Health
Sharon Vipler, MD, Physician, Fraser Health

Family physicians and addiction specialists are frequently asked to make assessments for driving and occupational safety in the setting of substance use, but there is a lack of evidence to guide best practices. To fill this gap, a guideline document was prepared for the Fraser Health Authority in British Columbia. The guideline outlines an evidence- and experience-informed assessment and monitoring process, and places emphasis on the need for practitioner self-reflection in order to balance a patient’s engagement in treatment with the duty to protect public safety. The guidelines also draw attention to the conflict of interest and lack of evidence-informed care that has been observed in some independent medical assessments for driving and occupational safety in BC. Overall, there is a greater need for research, guidelines, and training in substance use and its impact on occupational and driving safety; the Fraser Health guideline provides some foundation for this evolving area of practice.

Public Supply of Addictive Drugs: A Rapid Review

Paul Sobey, MD, CCFP(AM), DABAM, FASAM, CCSAM

Historically, the availability of mood-altering substances — whether illicit or prescription — has increased risk for use, and that risk tends to be concentrated among vulnerable populations. Over the last 20 or more years, fatal and non-fatal overdoses have risen. This coincides with increased availability of opioids, beginning with prescription oxycodone in the mid-90s driving the availability and demand for high-quality heroin, and, more recently, high-potency illicit fentanyls and other opioid analogues.

Several approaches that target the drug supply have evolved. One such approach is the provision of pharmaceutical opioids, heroin, crystal methamphetamine, cocaine, or other substances to people who are addicted to or dependent on these substances, and who are at high risk for poisoning and for witnessed or unwitnessed consumption: Public Supply of Addictive Drugs (PSAD), referred to as Safe Supply.

Public Supply of Addictive Drugs: A Rapid Review was conducted at the request of Alberta’s Ministry of Health and completed earlier this year. Specific outcomes of interest were: fatal and non-fatal poisoning, the health and safety of individuals or communities (e.g., crime, drug diversion), any other benefits or consequences. Outcomes of this study will be discussed.

Topics in Inpatient and Outpatient Care

The Adoption of Measurement-Based Care in an Inpatient Addiction Treatment Facility: From Pilot to Full Implementation

Shannon Remers, MSc, Senior Manager, Research and Outcomes, Homewood Health
Robert Waterman, PhD, Research Associate, Homewood Health
Emily Rossi, BSc, Research Assistant, Homewood Health

The use of standardized measurement in the treatment of mental health, substance use, and concurrent disorders has many benefits including enhancing clinical care, supporting quality improvement efforts, and providing the foundation for scientific research. In this session, attendees will learn how Homewood Health moved to a measurement-based care program across its entire continuum of services.

Opening an Addictions Medicine Unit Amid the Opioid Crisis in Sudbury Ontario: Identifying Barriers in Service in the Acute Care Hospital Setting

Adele Bodson, RN, BScN, Quality and Education Lead for Addiction Services, Health Sciences North
Tara Leary, MD, CCFP, FCFP, Regional Addictions Physician Lead, Operational Engagement, Health Sciences North
Lyndsey Holder, RN, BScN, Nurse Clinician Addictions Medicine Unit, Health Sciences North

This presentation will provide an overview of the Addictions Medicine Unit at Health Sciences North, a tertiary care northern referral centre in Sudbury, Ontario. It will examine the barriers overcome, the many successes, and next steps both on the unit and throughout a large acute care hospital.

Concurrent Mood, Anxiety, and Substance Use Disorder Treatment: Evaluation of a Novel Inpatient Program at Homewood Health Centre

Yelena Chorny, MD, MSc, CCFP(AM), Chief of Addiction & Trauma Services, Homewood Health Centre
Shannon Remers, MSc, Senior Manager, Research and Outcomes, Homewood Health Inc

The Mood, Anxiety and Concurrent program (MACP) is a novel nine-week inpatient program for people with substance use and concurrent mood and/or anxiety disorders delivered at Homewood Health Centre in Guelph, Ontario. Clients complete the Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Unified Protocol, as well as Motivational Enhancement and CBT-based interventions for substance use disorders. The program opened on February 28, 2022 and presenters will share evaluation data from the first six months of the program’s delivery.

Early Experiences with a Novel Mobile Addiction Team to Improve Community Capacity and Access: Lessons Learned from the MMATICCA Project

Erin Knight, MD, CCFP(AM), Educational Director, Addiction Medicine Enhanced Skills Residency Program, University of Manitoba
Ian Whetter, MD, MD, Medical Director, Ongomiizwin Health Services
Simon Sarpong, MD, Physician, Amdocs
Shohan Illsley, MSc, Executive Director, Manitoba Harm Reduction Network Inc.

MMATICCA stands for Manitoba Mobile Addiction Team to Increase Community Capacity and Access. The MMATICCA project aims to improve treatment of problematic substance use in remote Indigenous communities in Manitoba, where access to care is limited or non-existent. An interdisciplinary team provides intensive in-community addiction medicine education and assessments, and works alongside local providers to deliver hands-on mentorship and advice. The goal is not only to provide direct services to community members, but to build local capacity for working with people who use substances so that at the conclusion of the project pilot communities will have access to ongoing and sustainable care.

Presenters will provide an overview of the service, including a description of the partnerships and development of the project, early learnings from the initial project rollout, interim evaluation measures and more.

Rapid Access Addiction Medicine Clinics Improve Outcomes for People with Opioid Use Disorder: A Multi-Site Retrospective Cohort Study

Kim Corace, PhD, CPsych, Vice President, Innovation & Transformation, Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre
Brian Hutton, PhD, Senior Scientist | Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Kednapa Thavorn, PhD, Senior Scientist, Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Kelly Suschinsky, PhD, Program Evaluation Coordinator, Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre
Melanie Willows, MD, Clinical Director, Substance Use and Concurrent Disorders Program, Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre
Pamela Leece, MD, Public Health Physician, Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion
Meldon Kahan, MD, Medical Director, Substance Use Service, Women’s College Hospital
Larry Nijmeh, MD, Physician, Lakeridge Health
Natalie Aubin, PhD, Regional Vice President North East Cancer Care and Vice President Social Accountability, Health Sciences North
Michael Roach, MN, Regional Lead, Addictions Services, Health Sciences North
Gord Garner, Vice President, Strategic Partnerships, Community Addictions Peer Support Association

RAAM clinics are low-barrier, walk-in clinics that offer rapid access to evidence-based care for people with problematic substance use. Researchers conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from four Ontario RAAM clinics and provincial health administrative data. They found the RAAM model was associated with a significant reduction in the composite outcome of emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations for any reason, and all-cause mortality at 30 days and 90 days following clients’ initial RAAM visit; both remained significant when only opioid-related hospitalizations and ED visits were considered. They conclude that RAAM clinics are an effective model of care for people with OUD with evidence for improved patient outcomes and reduced acute healthcare utilization, and that these findings provide valuable evidence toward a broadened adoption of the RAAM model in other regions of Canada.

Still Naively Hopeful, and You Can Be Too! Again! — First-Year-In-Practice Learnings Around Substance Use Disorders

Brendan Groat, MD, Certificate in Global Health, BEd, BScKin, Physician, General Practitioner, Westside Saskatoon Community Clinic & La Ronge, SK

In this experiential and interactive session — including some cases and round table small groups — participants will have the opportunity to crowdsource practice ponderings, get tips, be reassured by shared difficulties, learn to enjoy clinically challenging patients. This workshop is intended for trainees and early-career health professionals.

Quebec Clinical Guidance to Using Slow-Release Oral Morphine in OAT

Marie-Eve Goyer, MD, MSc, CCMT (MT), scientific director, Équipe de soutien clinique et organisationnel en dépendance et itinérance, CIUSSS CCSMTL
Karine Hudon, Coordinator
Elise Schurter, M.Sc., Research professional, Équipe de soutien clinique et organisationnel en dépendance et itinérance
Julie Horman, MD, Psychiatrist, CISSS du Bas-Saint-Laurent installation Rivière-Du-Loup
Rudy Hinh-Thai, PharmD, Pharmacist
Marie-Josee Dion, Information Officer, Équipe de soutien clinique et organisationnel en dépendance et itinérance, CIUSSS CCSMTL

Opioid agonist therapy is the first-line treatment for opioid use disorder and has been proven an effective strategy to lower incidence of hepatitis C and other drug-related harms in people who inject drugs. Although buprenorphine/naloxone and methadone are the standard treatment, there has been an increased interest in the use of slow-release oral morphine (SROM). SROM is administered orally, once daily, and can be prescribed in addition to safer supply. This guide to using SROM aims to summarize available literature and Quebec clinical expertise to support clinicians in their practice.

Developing a National, Online Training Curriculum for Pain Management and Substance Use Disorder for Postgraduate Medical Education and Continuing Professional Development

Lisa Graves, MD, Project Lead, The Association of Faculties of Medicine Canada
Jeanne Mulder, PhD, Director, Online Learning, and Assistant Professor, Queen’s University
Amber Hastings-Truelove, PhD, Health Education Researcher and Consultant, Queen’s University
Nancy Dalgarno, PhD, Director, Education Scholarship, Queen’s University
Richard van Wylick, MD, FRCPC, Associate Professor, Queen’s University
Lynsee Stephens, Course Development Lead, Queen’s University
Fran Kirby, MeD, Director, Member Services, The Association of Faculties of Medicine Canada
Robert van Hoorn, Project Manager, The Association of Faculties of Medicine Canada

The Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada has developed a national, bilingual, comprehensive, and competency-based curriculum for postgraduate medical education and continuing professional development learners. The curriculum will be launched in March 2023 and provided to all 17 Canadian medical schools. In this workshop, participants will explore the content of the curriculum and reflect on the implementation of this curriculum in their own teaching and learning environments.